The Best Songwriters from the Golden Age of Hollywood – Part One – The Great Composers.

The Thirties to the Sixties

Fifty-six composers are listed, from Harold Arlen to Victor Young. Clockwise from top left: Irving Berlin, Jimmy Van Heusen, Harry Warren, Harold Arlen, Jerome Kern, Jule Stein (with Barbra), Jay Livingston, Sammy Fain, Frank Loesser
The 200 songs are classified based on the song’s Composer with the song’s lyricist listed in the accompanying table along with the film’s title, the film’s director, the actor or singer or actor dubbed by a singer who first sang the song, and whether the song was nominated or won the Oscar outright.
A mirror image post where the same 200 songs are classified based on the Lyricist is also fun to read.

HERE ARE 30 CLASSIC SONGS FROM HOLLYWOOD’S GOLDEN AGE THAT WERE WRITTEN DIRECTLY FOR THE SCREEN BUT WERE NOT NOMINATED FOR AN OSCAR BY THE MUSIC BRANCH OF THE ACADEMY.

Four are by George and Ira Gershwin; three are by Irving Berlin; three are by Frank Churchill and Larry Morey; three are by composer Harry Warren; two with lyricist Mack Gordon, and one with lyricist Al Dubin; three are by composer Jimmy Van Heusen; two with lyricist Johnny Burke, and one with lyricist Sammy Cahn.

I Only Have Eyes for You (1934): Harry Warren and Al Dubin (Dames)
My Old Flame (1934): Arthur Johnson and Sam Coslow (Belle of the Nineties)
I’m in the Mood for Love (1935): Jimmy McHugh and Dorothy Fields (Roberta)
Let’s Face the Music and Dance (1936): Irving Berlin (Follow the Fleet)
Pick Yourself Up (1936): Jerome Kern and Dorothy Fields (Swing Time)
Let’s Call the Whole Thing Off (1937) George and Ira Gershwin (Shall We Dance)
A Foggy Day (in London Town) (1937) George and Ira Gershwin (A Damsel in Distress)
Nice Work If You Can Get It (1937) George and Ira Gershwin (A Damsel in Distress)
I’ve Got My Love to Keep Me Warm (1937) Irving Berlin (On the Avenue)
Love is Here to Stay (1938) George and Ira Gershwin (The Goldwyn Follies)
The Folks Who Live on the Hill (1937): Jerome Kern and Oscar Hammerstein II (High, Wide, and Handsome)
Heigh-Ho (1937): Frank Churchill and Larry Morley (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs)
Someday My Prince Will Come (1937): Frank Churchill and Larry Morey (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs)
Whistle While You Work (1937): Frank Churchill and Larry Morley (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs)
Hooray for Hollywood (1938): Richard Whiting and Johnny Mercer (Hollywood Hotel)
It’s a Great Day for the Irish (1940): Roger Edens (Little Nellie Kelly)
At Last (1941): Harry Warren and Mack Gordon (Sun Valley Serenade)
I’ll Remember April (1941): Gene de Paul, Patricia Johnson, and Don Raye (Ride’ Em Cowboy)
You Don’t Know What Love Is (1942): Gene de Paul and Don Raye (Keep ‘Em Flying)
Let’s Get Lost (1943): Jimmy McHugh and Frank Loesser (Happy Go Lucky)
One for My Baby (and One More for the Road (1943): Harold Arlen and Johnny Mercer (The Sky’s the Limit)
The Boy Next Door (1944): Ralph Blane & Hugh Martin (Meet Me in St. Louis)
Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas (1944): Ralph Blane & Hugh Martin (Meet Me in St. Louis)
Like Someone in Love (1944): Jimmy Van Heusen and Johnny Burke (Belle of the Yukon)
The More I See You (1945) Harry Warren and Mack Gordon (Diamond Horseshoe)
Put the Blame on Mame (1946) Doris Fisher and Allan Roberts (Gilda)
But Beautiful (1947): Jimmy Van Heusen and Johnny Burke (The Road to Rio)
Steppin’ Out With My Baby (1948): Irving Berlin (Easter Parade)
That’s Entertainment (1953): Arthur Schwartz and Howard Dietz (The Bandwagon)
Ain’t That a Kick in the Head (1960): Jimmy Van Heusen and Sammy Cahn (Oceans 11)
SOME GREAT SONGWRITERS, LIKE HARRY WARREN, WROTE ALMOST EXCLUSIVELY FOR THE MOVIES, WHILE OTHERS, SUCH AS RODGERS AND HART, PREFERRED TO DEBUT THEIR SONGS ON THE BROADWAY STAGE.
MEANWHILE, THE MAJORITY OF SONGWRITERS DURING THIS PERIOD WENT BACK AND FORTH BETWEEN THE TWO MEDIUMS.

Several great songwriters or songwriting teams did minimal or no writing for the movies, preferring to debut their work on the Broadway stage instead. As a result, there isn’t a single song from Burton Lane, Lerner & Loewe, Comden and Green, or Rodgers and Hart on my list, and only one song from Rodgers and Hammerstein II (Hammerstein himself, however, gets numerous mentions from this collaboration with other composers). Cole Porter was a bit more adventurous with four of his best-known songs represented.

George and Ira Gershwin finally succumbed to the charms of the West Coast in 1937 and ended up writing songs for three movies (“Shall We Dance,” “A Damsel in Distress,” and “The Goldwyn Follies,” most of which have entered the Jazz canon and The Great American Songbook. Ten years later, Ira took some old compositions by George and added lyrics. The result is the song score for the 1947 film “The Shocking Mrs Pilgrim” (one of the songs in “The Goldwyn Follies,” “Loved Walked In,” was also an old George composition given new life by Ira after his brother’s untimely death).

Irving Berlin tops the list with twenty-one songs, followed by Harry Warren with twenty, and Harold Arlen and Jimmy Van Heusen with eighteen songs.

Many of Berlin’s greatest songs debuted in the classic Astaire-Rogers RKO movies of the 1930s

Warren pioneered writing songs directly for the movies at Warner Bros. in the early thirties (with his then-partner lyricist Al Dubin).

Arlen is arguably the greatest songwriter of Hollywood’s Golden Era. The son of a cantor, Arlen became the musical director and, with his lyricist Ted Kohler, the house composer for Harlem’s famed Cotton Club during its peak years in the late nineteen twenties and early thirties. Moving to Hollywood, he wrote a string of classics for the movies with lyricists Johnny Mercer, Ira Gershwin, and Kohler, and with lyricist Yip Harburg, he composed his most lasting contribution to film, the soundtrack to “The Wizard of Oz.” It made Judy Garland a star, and she got to sing Arlen/Harburg’s Oscar-winning “Over the Rainbow,” the greatest movie song ever written. Together with songwriters Ralph Blane and Hugh Martin, Arlen played a significant role, if not the central role, in creating the phenomenon that was Judy Garland.

With his lyricists, Johnny Burke and Sammy Cahn, Van Heusen played a massive part in creating the personas of Bing Crosby and Frank Sinatra, respectively.

Composers George Gershwin, Jerome Kern, Frank Churchill, and Jule Stein have a strong showing while the contribution of such gifted lyricists as Ned Washington, Johnny Mercer, Paul Francis Webster, Mack Gordon, Yip Harburg, and Dorothy Fields is probably better appreciated in the companion article: https://thebrownees.net/the-best-songwriters-from-the-golden-age-of-hollywood-part-two-the-great-lyricists/

THE CLASSIC MOVIE SONG ARRIVED COURTESY OF THE ASTAIRE – ROGERS MOVIES AT RKO.

We also cannot underestimate the influence of director Mark Sandrich and the Fred Astaire-Ginger Rogers musicals at RKO in the thirties. They started the ball rolling, introducing one Oscar-winning or Oscar-nominated song after another, including the very first Oscar-winner, “The Continental” by Con Conrad and Herb Magidson. They also introduced movie audiences to the genius of Irving Berlin, Jerome Kern, and George Gershwin.

If the RKO musicals reeked of class and sophistication, over at Warner Bros., it was a far grittier affair as pre-code guys and dames started to put on a show at every opportunity. Thanks to the talents of Harry Warren and his partner Al Dubin, the first songwriters to write songs exclusively for the silver screen, director Lloyd Bacon and the choreographer extraordinaire Busby Berkeley delivered the first great movie musical, “42 Street,” in 1933. This was followed by “Gold Diggers of 1933” and “Gold Diggers of 1935” and many more until the decade’s end.

The Harold Arlen/Yip Harburg songs for The Wizard of Oz,” including the all-time classic “Over the Rainbow,” are landmarks in Hollywood’s musical history.

Finally, the endless number of classics Jimmy Van Heusen and Johnny Burke wrote for Paramount’s Road Movies are a stunning body of work often underappreciated.

THE MAJORITY OF THE GREAT SONGWRITING TEAMS HAD A DESIGNATED COMPOSER AND A DESIGNATED LYRICIST.
HOWEVER

Ralph Blane and Hugh Martin were unusual in that they both wrote the music and the lyrics to songs that were an essential part of both “Meet Me in St. Louis” and “Good News.” Doris Fisher and Allan Roberts seemed to have a similar relationship in the songs they wrote for “Gilda”

Cole Porter and Irvin Berlin wrote both the music and the lyrics to (almost all) of their songs, while Frank Loesser and Johnny Mercer also managed to achieve this double whammy on a few of their best songs.

“MOVIE SONGS” THAT WERE NEVER IN A MOVIE
THE FILM SCORE WAS SO HAUNTING THAT LYRICS WERE ADDED TO THE MAIN THEME OR THE INCIDENTAL BACKGROUND SCORE AFTER THE MOVIE WAS RELEASED.
Several famous songs associated with movies were never in the film they are associated with.

The most famous example is the song “Laurafrom the 1944 movie of the same name. David Raksin’s central theme was so popular that Johnny Mercer added lyrics, and a hit song was born. Mercer repeated the honor in 1964 when he added lyrics to Johnny Madel’s main theme for “The Americanization of Emily,” giving us the song “Emily.”

“Easy Living,” the song by Ralph Rainger and Leo Robin, was not in the movie “Easy Living.” After the film’s release, Robin added the lyrics to Rainger’s background score.

Victor Young (already represented here by three movie songs) had three of his main themes/instrumentals adapted to song by his favorite lyricists after the film’s release: “Stella by Starlight” from “ The Uninvited” (1944) (lyrics by Ned Washington), “When I Fall in Love” from “One Minute to Zero” (1952) (lyrics by Edward Heyman) and “Around the Worldfrom “Around the World in 80 Days” (1956) with lyrics by Harold Adamson. All became massive hits, and, like “Love Letters” and “ My Foolish Heart,” they have entered the Great American Songbook and the jazz canon.

Bronislaw Kaper’s central theme from the now-forgotten MGM movie “Green Dolphin Street” has also become part of the Great American Songbook and the Jazz canon, thanks to such Jazz greats as Miles Davis and Bill Evans. However, unlike the songs mentioned above, the theme is almost always played as an instrumental and rarely, if ever, performed as the song “(On) Green Dolphin Street,” for which Ned Washington wrote the lyrics – not among his best –after the movie was released in 1947.

Charlie Chaplin’s gorgeous and romantic incidental music for his 1936 movie “Modern Times“ – mostly silent except for some ingenious sound effects and an orchestral score soundtrack – was an instant hit with audiences from the moment the film was released. However, it was not until 1954 that John Turner and Geoffrey Parsons added those lyrics, and the song “Smile” was born, which immediately became an instant smash for Nat King Cole. Chaplin did go on to win the Oscar for Best Original Score of 1972 for “Limelight” as the result of two almost inconceivable coincidences:

  • The disqualification of Nino Rota’s Original Score for “The Godfather”
  • 1972 marked the first screening of Chaplin’s 1954 film “Limelight” in LA. The Los Angeles powers refused to allow a screening in ‘54 because of the great director’s perceived leftist leanings. Chaplin had already moved to Switzerland with his family in 19
WE THINK OF THEM AS MOVIE SONGS.
BUT THEY ARE NOT MOVIE SONGS.
WHY NOT?
BECAUSE THEY WERE NOT WRITTEN SPECIFICALLY FOR THE MOVIE IN QUESTION.
THEY WERE WRITTEN FOR THE BROADWAY STAGE OR AS A STAND-ALONE HIT RECORD.

One of the quintessential songs associated with the movies is Herman Hupfeld’s “As Time Goes By,” which was used to great effect when sung and “played” by Dooley Wilson in the Warner Bros. classic “Casablanca” (Michael Curtiz, 1942/1943).”However, it is not a movie song at all. Originally written for the Broadway show “Everybody’s Welcome” in 1931, it was introduced by Frances Williams. The song was reintroduced in “Casablanca,” where studio pianist Jean-Vincent Plummer played Wilson’s piano accompaniment. The song’s melody was incorporated into Max Steiner’s famous score and used as a leitmotif throughout the film. The rest is Hollywood history.

The song “I’ll Be Seeing You” was composed by Sammy Fain with lyrics by Irving Kahal in 1938 and inserted into the Broadway musical “Right This Way,” which closed after fifteen performances. The title of the 1944 film “I’ll Be Seeing You” was taken from this song at the suggestion of the film’s producer, Dore Schary. The song was included in the film’s soundtrack and became a huge hit when re-released.

A similar story concerns Frank Sinatra’s 1953 comeback smash “Young at Heart.” With music by Johnny Richards and lyrics by Carolyn Lee, the song was such a monumental hit that an untitled 1954 movie – which Sinatra was filming at the time with director Gordon Douglas and costar Doris Day – was not only named after the song but the song was included in both the opening and closing credits of the movie.

Another famous example is “The Last Time I Saw Paris,” which was composed as a stand-alone song by Jerome Kern with lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II in 1940. In 1941, Ann Sothern sang it in the film “Lady Be Good,” the song was nominated for an Oscar. It then WON the Academy Award for Best Original Song of 1941, beating such deserving authentic originals as “Blues in the Night,” “Chattanooga Choo Choo,” and “Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy.” Kern was so upset at receiving an Oscar for a song not written for the movies that he petitioned AMPAS to change the wording on the Best Original Song ballots.

Since 1942, a nominated song must be introduced in its corresponding film.

Ten singers plus the Glenn Miller Orchestra INTRODUCED almost half of the songs listed. They are FRED ASTAIRE. BING CROSBY. JUDY GARLAND. GINGER ROGERS. FRANK SINATRA. DICK POWELL. DORIS DAY. ALICE FAYE. DICK HAYMES. IRENE DUNNE. THE GLENN MILLER ORCHESTRA. A COMBINED TOTAL OF 91 OUT OF THE 200 SONGS LISTED (46%).

Fred Astaire introduced 25 songs. Fourteen are from the Astaire-Rogers movies. Of these, five were duets WITH Rogers. six were sung TO Rogers. One (“Change Partners”) was sung to no one in particular, although he danced with Rogers, and two were without Rogers. Bing Crosby introduced 15 songs. Judy Garland introduced 13 songs. In addition to their five duets, Ginger Rogers got to sing three songs of her own – “The Picolino,” “They All Laughed,” and “Let Yourself Go” – from the Astaire-Rogers RKO movies. Together with her introduction of “Shuffle Off to Buffalo” from “42nd Street” and “We’re in the Money” from “Gold Diggers of 1933”, this gives Rogers the honor of introducing or co-introducing ten songs from Hollywood’s golden age. Frank Sinatra introduced eight. Dick Powell introduced six. Alice Faye introduced five. Doris Day introduced four. Dick Haymes introduced four. Irene Dunne introduced three. Glenn Miller and his Orchestra presented three, two featuring The Nicholas Brothers.

Harold Arlen

HAROLD ARLEN

(18)

YearFilm TitleSong TitleComposerLyricistDirectorIntroduced byNominationOscar
1933Let’s Fall in LoveLet’s Fall in LoveHarold ArlenTed KohlerDavid BurtonArt Jarrett and the chorus.

Ann Sothern
Pre-Musicians Branch AMPASPre-Musicians Branch AMPAS
1939Love AffairSing My HeartHarold ArlenTed KohlerLeo McCareyIrene Dunne
1939At the CircusLydia the Tattooed LadyHarold ArlenYip HarburgEdward BuzzellGroucho Marks
1939The Wizard of OzOver the RainbowHarold ArlenYip HarburgVictor Fleming Judy GarlandOscar
Nomination
Oscar
1939The Wizard of OzFollow the Yellow Brick Road/We’re Off to See the WizardHarold ArlenYip HarburgVictor FlemingJudy Garland and the Munchkin Chorus

Judy Garland, Ray Bolger, Jack Haley, and Bert Lahr
1939The Wizard of OzIf I Only Had a Brain | Heart | NerveHarold ArlenYip HarburgVictor FlemingRay Bolger
Jack Haley
Bert Lahr
1939The Wizard of OzIf I Were King of the ForestHarold ArlenYip HarburgVictor FlemingBert Lahr
1939The Wizard of OzThe Merry Old Land of OzHarold ArlenYip HarburgVictor FlemingThe Emerald City Townspeople
1939The Wizard of OzDing Dong! The Witch is DeadHarold ArlenYip HarburgVictor FlemingBillie Burke and the Munchkin Chorus
1941Blues in the NightBlues in the NightHarold ArlenJohnny MercerAnatole LitvakWilliam GillespieOscar Nomination
1941Blues in the NightThis Time the Dream’s on MeHarold ArlenJohnny MercerAnatole LitvakPricilla Lane
1943Cabin in the CottonHappiness is a Thing Called JoeHarold ArlenYip HarburgVincente MinnelliEthel WatersOscar Nomination
1943Star Spangled RhythmThat Old Black MagicHarold ArlenJohnny MercerGeorge MarshallJohnny JohnsonOscar Nomination
1943The Sky’s the LimitMy Shining HourHarold ArlenJohnny MercerEdward H. GriffithFred Astaire and Joan Leslie (dubbed by Sally Sweetland)Oscar Nomination-
1943The Sky’s the LimitOne for My Baby (and One More for the Road)Harold ArlenJohnny MercerEdward H. GriffithFred Astaire
1945 Here Come the WavesAc-Cent-Tchu-Ate-the PositiveHarold ArlenJohnny MercerMark SandrichBing CrosbyOscar Nomination _
1954A Star is BornThe Man That Got AwayHarold ArlenIra GershwinGeorge CukorJudy GarlandOscar Nomination _
1963I Could Go On SingingI Could Go On SingingHarold ArlenYip HarburgRonald NeameJudy Garland

Irving Berlin

IRVING BERLIN

(21)

YearFilm Title Song TitleComposerLyricistDirectorIntroduced byNominationOscar
1930Puttin’ On the RitzPuttin’ On the Ritz*Irving BerlinIrving BerlinEdward SlomanHarry Richman and the chorus
The first song in film to be by an interracial ensemble
1935Top HatCheek to CheekIrving BerlinIrving BerlinMark Sandrich Fred Astaire (to Ginger Rogers)Oscar Nomination
1935Top HatTop Hat, White Tie, and TailsIrving BerlinIrving BerlinMark SandrichFred Astaire
1935Top HatIsn’t This a Lovely Day (to be Caught in the Rain)Irving BerlinIrving BerlinMark SandrichFred Astaire (to Ginger Rogers)
1935Top HatNo Strings (I’m Fancy-Free)Irving BerlinIrving BerlinMark SandrichFred Astaire
1935Top HatThe PiccolinoIrving BerlinIrving BerlinMark SandrichGinger Rogers (to Fred Astaire)
1936Follow the FleetLet’s Face the Music and DanceIrving BerlinIrving BerlinMark SandrichFred Astaire (to Ginger Rogers)
1936Follow the FleetLet Yourself GoIrving BerlinIrving BerlinMark SandrichGinger Rogers
1936Follow the FleetGet Thee Behind Me SatanIrving BerlinIrving BerlinMark SandrichHarriet Hilliard
1936Follow the FleetI’m Putting All of My Eggs in One BasketIrving BerlinIrving BerlinMark SandrichFred Astaire (to Ginger Rogers)
1936On the AvenueYou’re Laughing at MeIrving BerlinIrving BerlinMark SandrichDick Powell
1937On the AvenueSlumming on Park AvenueIrving BerlinIrving BerlinRoy Del RuthAlice Faye
1937On the AvenueThis Year’s KissesIrving BerlinIrving BerlinRoy Del RuthAlice Faye
1937On the AvenueI’ve Got My Love to Keep Me WarmIrving BerlinIrving BerlinRoy Del RuthDick Powell and Alice Faye
1938CarefreeChange PartnersIrving BerlinIrving BerlinMark SandrichFred Astaire (the scene features Kay Sutton and Ginger Rogers)Oscar Nomination
1939Second FiddleI Poured My Heart into a SongIrving BerlinIrving BerlinSidney LanfieldRudy ValleeOscar Nomination
1942Holiday InnWhite ChristmasIrving BerlinIrving BerlinMark SandrichBing CrosbyOscar NominationOscar Win
1946Blue SkiesYou Keep Coming Back Like a SongIrving BerlinIrving BerlinStuart HeislerBing CrosbyOscar Nomination
1949Easter ParadeSteppin’ Out With My BabyIrving BerlinIrving BerlinCharles WatersFred Astaire__
1954White ChristmasCount Your BlessingsIrving BerlinIrving BerlinMichael CurtizBing CrosbyOscar Nomination
1954White ChristmasSistersIrving BerlinIrving BerlinMichael CurtizRosemary Clooney and Vera-Ellen.
Bing Crosby and Danny Kaye (Reprise)
* Although Belin did not write the song specifically for a film, the movie was built around the theme, which made its first appearance here as introduced by Harry Richman. More famous movie versions were to follow, most notably Clark Gable in “Idiot’s Delight” and Fred Astaire in “Blues Skies.” It is the Astaire version that most people remember today.

Elmer Bernstein

ELMER BERNSTEIN 

(2)

YearFilm TitleSong TitleComposerLyricistDirectorIntroduced byNominationOscar
1962Walk on the WildsideWalk on the WildsideElmer BernsteinMack DavidEdward DmytrykBrook BentonOscar Nomination
1966HawaiiMy Wishing DollElmer BernsteinMack DavidGeorge Roy HillJulie AndrewsOscar Nomination

Nacio Herb Brown

Nacio Herb Brown 

(1)

YearFilm TitleSong TitleComposerLyricistDirectorIntroduced byNominationOscar
1952Singing in the rainMake ‘Em LaughNacio Herb BrownArthur FreedStanley Donen and Gene KellyDonald O’Connor

Ralph Blane and Hugh Martin

RALPH BLANE and HUGH MARTIN

(4)

YearFilm TitleSong TitleComposer and LyricistDirectorIntroduced byNominationOscar
1944Meet Me in Saint LouisThe Trolly SongRalph Blane and Hugh MartinVincente MinnelliJudy GarlandOscar Nomination
1944Meet Me in Saint LouisHave Yourself a Merry Little ChristmasRalph Blane and Hugh MartinVincente MinnelliJudy Garland
1944Meet Me in Saint LouisThe Boy Next DoorRalph Blane and Hugh MartinVincente Minnelli Judy Garland
1947Good NewsPass That Peace PipeRalph Blane. Hugh Martin & Roger EdensCharles WaltersJoan McCrackenOscar Nomination

Hoagy Carmichael

HOAGY CARMICHAEL

(2)

YearFilm TitleSong TitleComposerLyricistDirectorIntroduced byNominationOscar
1946Canyon PassageOle Buttermilk SkyHoagy CarmichaelJack BrooksJacques TourneurHoagy CarmichaelOscar Nomination
1951Here Comes the GroomIn The Cool, Cool, Cool of the EveningHoagy CarmichaelJohnny MercerFrank CapraBing Crosby and Jane WymanOscar NominationOscar Win

Frank Churchill

FRANK CHURCHILL

(5)

YearFilm TitleSong TitleComposerLyricistDirectorIntroduced byNominationOscar
1937Snow White and the Seven DwarfsSomeday My Prince Will ComeFrank ChurchillLarry MoreyDavid Hand/Perce Pearce/William Cottrell/Larry Morey/Wilfred Jackson/Ben SharpsteenAdriana Caselotti
1937Snow White and the Seven DwarfsWhistle While You WorkFrank ChurchillLarry MoreyDavid Hand/Perce Pearce/William Cottrell/Larry Morey/Wilfred Jackson/Ben SharpsteenAdriana Caselotti
1937Snow White and the Seven DwarfsHeigh-HoFrank ChurchillLarry MoreyDavid Hand/Perce Pearce/William Cottrell/Larry Morey/Wilfred Jackson/Ben SharpsteenRoy Atwell/Pinto Colvig/Billy Gilbert/Otis Harlan/Scotty Mattraw
1941DumboBaby MineFrank ChurchillNed WashingtonBen SharpsteenBetty NoyesOscar Nomination
1942BambiLove is a SongFrank ChurchillLarry MoreyLarry MoreyDonald NoivisOscar Nomination_

Con Conrad

CON CONRAD

(1)

YearFilm TitleSong TitleComposerLyricistDirectorIntroduced byNominationOscar
1934The Gay DivorceeThe ContinentalCon ConradHerb MagidsonMark Sandrich Fred Astaire and Ginger RogersOscar NominationOscar Win

Gene de Paul

GENE DE PAUL

(4)

YearFilm TitleSong TitleComposerLyricistDirectorIntroduced byNominationOscar
1941Ride ‘Em Cowboy I’ll Remember AprilGene de PaulPatricia Johnson & Don RayeArthur LubinDick Foran_
1942Keep ‘Em FlyingYou Don’t Know What Love isGene de PaulDon RayeArthur LubinCarol Bruce__
1943I Dood ItStar EyesGene de PaulDon RayeVincente MinnelliJimmy Dorsey and his Orchestra__
1943 He’s My GuyHe’s My GuyGene de PaulDon RayeEdward F. ClineDick Foran and Joan Davis__

Frank De Vol 

(1)

YearFilm TitleSong TitleComposerLyricistDirectorIntroduced byNominationOscar
1964Hush, Hush, Sweet CharlotteHush, Hush, Sweet CharlotteFrank De VolMack DavidRobert AldrichAl MartinoOscar Nomination

Matt Dennis

MATT DENNIS

(1)

YearFilm TitleSong TitleComposerLyricistDirectorIntroduced byNominationOscar
1953JenniferAngel Eyes*Matt DennisEarl BrentJoel NewtonMatt Dennis
* Although the song was written in 1946, it was not introduced until 1953 by its composer, Matt Dennis.

Roger Edens

ROGER EDENS

(6)

YearFilm TitleSong TitleComposer and LyricistDirectorIntroduced byNominationOscar
1940Little Nellie KellyIt’s a Great Day for the IrishMusic and lyrics by Roger EdensNorman TaurogJudy Garland
1940Strike Up the BandOur Love AffairRoger Edens and Arthur FreedBusbey Berkeley Judy GarlandOscar Nomination
1947Good NewsPass That Peace PipeRalph Blane, Hugh Martin & Roger EdensCharles WaltersJoan McCrackenOscar Nomination
1954A Star is BornBorn in a TrunkRoger Edens and Leonard GersheGeorge CukorJudy Garland
1957Funny FaceThink Pink!Roger Edens and Leonard GersheStanley DonenKay Thompson
1957Funny FaceBonjour Paris!Roger Edens and Leonard GersheStanley DonenFred Astaire, Audrey Hepburn, and Kay Thompson

Sammy Fain

SAMMY FAIN

(5)

YearFilm TitleSong TitleComposerLyricistDirectorIntroduced byNominationOscar
1937Walter Wanger’s Vogues of 1938That Old FeelingSammy FainLew BrownIrving CummingsVirginia VerrillOscar Nomination
1953Calamity JaneSecret LoveSammy FainPaul Francis WebsterDavid ButlerDoris DayOscar NominationOscar Win
1955Love is a Many Splendored ThingLove is a Many Splendored ThingSammy FainPaul Francis WebsterHenry KingThe Four AcesOscar NominationOscar
Win
1957April LoveApril LoveSammy FainPaul Francis WebsterHenry LevinPat BooneOscar Nomination
1962Tender is the NightTender is the NightSammy FainPaul Francis WebsterHenry KingGeorge Greeley (pianist: uncredited)Oscar Nomination

Sylvia Fine

SYLVIA FINE

(1)

YEARFILMSONGCOMPOSERLYRICISTDIRECTORINTRODUCED BYNOMINATIONOSCAR
1959The Five PenniesThe Five PenniesSylvia FineSylvia FineMelville ShavelsonDanny KayeOscar Nomination

DORIS FISHER and ALLAN ROBERTS

(2)

YEARFILMSONGCOMPOSER and LYRICISTDIRECTORINTRODUCED BYNominationOscar
1946GildaPut the Blame on MameDoris Fisher and Allan RobertsCharles VidorRita Hayworth (dubbed by Anita Ellis)__
1946GildaAmado MioDoris Fisher and Allan RobertsCharles VidoeRita Hayworth (dubbed by Anita Ellis)__

GEORGE GERSHWIN

(12)

YearFilm TitleSong TitleComposerLyricistDirectorIntroduced byNominationOscar
1937Shall We DanceThey Can’t Take That Away from MeGeorge GershwinIra GershwinMark SandrichFred Astaire to Ginger RogersOscar Nomination
1937Shall We DanceThey All Laughed (at Christopher Columbus)George GershwinIra GershwinMark SandrichGinger Rogers to Fred Astaire
1937Shall We DanceLet’s Call the Whole Thing OffGeorge GershwinIra GershwinMark SandrichFred Astaire and Ginger Rogers
1937A Damsel in DistressI Can’t Be Bothered NowGeorge GershwinIra GershwinGeorge StevensFred Astaire with backing vocals by the Stafford Sisters
1937A Damsel in DistressA Foggy Day (in London Town)George GershwinIra GershwinGeorge StevensFred Astaire
1937A Damsel in DistressNice Work if You Can Get ItGeorge GershwinIra GershwinGeorge StevensFred Astaire
1937Damsel in DistressThings Are Looking Up!George GershwinIra GershwinGeorge StevensFred Astaire
1938The Goldwyn FolliesI Was Doing All RightGeorge GershwinIra Gershwin George Marshall
and
H.C.Potter
Ella Logan (unseen – on the radio)
1938The Goldwyn FolliesLove is Here to StayGeorge GershwinIra Gershwin George Marshall
and
H.C.Potter
Kenny Baker
1938The Goldwyn Follies*Love Walked InGeorge GershwinIra Gershwin George Marshall
and
H.C.Potter
Kenny Baker
1947The Shocking Miss Pilgrim*Aren’t You Kinda Glad We Did?George GershwinIra GershwinGeorge SeatonDick Haymes and Betty Grable
1947The Shocking Miss Pilgrim*For You, For Me, For EvermoreGeorge GershwinIra GershwinGeorge SeatonDick Haymes and Betty Grable
* Old compositions of George with lyrics added later by Ira.

Herschel Burke Gilbert

HERSCHEL BURKE GILBERT

(1)

YEARFILMSONGCOMPOSERLYRICISTDIRECTORINTRODUCED BYNOMINATIONOSCAR
1953The Moon is BlueThe Moon is BlueHerschel Burke GilbertSylvia FineOtto PremingerThe Sauter-Finegan Orchestra withSally SweetlandOscar Nomination

ERNEST GOLD 

(1)

YearFilm TitleSong TitleComposerLyricistDirectorIntroduced byNominationOscar
1963It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad WorldIt’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad WorldErnest GoldMack DavidStanley KramerSung by an offscreen chorusOscar Nomination

Jay Gorney

JAY GORNEY

(1)

YearFilm TitleSong TitleComposerLyricistDirectorIntroduced byNominationOscar
1933Jimmy and SallyYou’re My ThrillJay GorneySidney ClareJames TinningLya LysPre-Musicians Branch AMPASPre-Musicians Branch AMPAS

Leigh harline

LEIGH HARLINE

(1)

YearFilm TitleSong TitleComposerLyricistDirectorIntroduced byNominationOscar
1940PinocchioWhen You Wish Upon a StarLeigh HarlineNed WashingtonBen Sharpsteen & Hamilton LuskeCliff EdwardsOscar NominationOscar Win

Jerome & Heindorf

M. K. JEROME and RAY HEINDORF

(1) and (1)

YearFilm TitleSong TitleComposerLyricistDirectorIntroduced byNominationOscar
1945San AntonioSome Sunday MorningRay Heindorf and M.K. JeromeTed KohlerDavid ButlerAlexis SmithOscar Nomination

Ray Henderson

RAY HENDERSON

(1)

YearFilm TitleSong TitleComposerLyricistDirectorIntroduced byNominationOscar
1935Curly TopAnimal Crackers in My SoupRay HendersonIrving Caeser and Ted KohlerIrving CummingsShirley Temple

Friedrich Hollaender

FRIEDRICH HOLLAENDER

(1)

YearFilm TitleSong TitleComposerLyricistDirectorIntroduced byNominationOscar
1939Destry Rides AgainSee What the Boys in the Back Room Will HaveFrederick HollaenderFrank LoesserGeorge MarshallMarlene Dietrich__

Arthur Johnston

ARTHUR JOHNSTON

(3)

YearFilm TitleSong TitleComposerLyricistDirectorIntroduced byNominationOscar
1934Murder at the VanitiesCocktails for TwoArthur JohnsonSam CoslowMitchell LeisenCarl Brisson
1934Belle of the NinetiesMy Old FlameArthur JohnsonSam CoslowLeo McCareyMae West
1936Pennies from HeavenPennies from HeavenArthur JohnstonJohnny BurkeNorman Z. McLeodBing CrosbyOscar Nomination

Bronislaw Kaper and Walter Jurmann

BRONISLAW KAPER and WALTER JURMANN

(2) and (1)

YearFilm TitleSong TitleComposer LyricistDirectorIntroduced byNominationOscar
1936San FranciscoSan FranciscoBronislaw Kaper (with Walter Jurmann)Gus KahnW.S.Van DykeJeanette MacDonald
1953LiliHi-Lili, Hi-LoBronislaw KaperHelen DeutschCharles WatersLeslie Caron and Mel Ferrer

Fred Karlin

FRED KARLIN

(1)

YearFilm TitleSong TitleComposerLyricistDirectorIntroduced byNominationOscar
1969The Sterile CuckooCone Saturday MorningFred KarlinDory PrevinAlan J. PakulaThe SandpipersOscar Nomination

Jerome Kern

JEROME KERN

(8)

YearFilm TitleSong TitleComposerLyricistDirectorIntroduced by NominationOscar
1935RobertaLovely to Look AtJerome Kern Dorothy Fields & Jimmy McHughWilliam A. SeiterIrene Dunne (Fred Astaire reprise)Oscar Nomination_
1935RobertaI Won’t Dance*Jerome KernDorothy Fields & Jimmy McHughWilliam A.SeiterFred Astaire and Ginger Rogers_
1936Swing TimeThe Way You Look TonightJerome KernDorothy FieldsGeorge StevensFred Astaire to Ginger RogersOscar NominationOscar win
1936Swing TimeA Fine RomanceJerome KernDorothy FieldsGeorge StevensFred Astaire and Ginger Rogers
1936Swing TimePick Yourself UpJerome KernDorothy FieldsGeorge StevensFred Astaire and Ginger Rogers
1937High, Wide, and HandsomeThe Folks Who Live on the HillJerome KernOscar Hammerstein IIRouben MamoulianIrene Dunne__
1941Lady Be GoodThe Last Time I Saw Paris**Jerome Kern Oscar Hammerstein IINorman Z. McLeodAnn SothernOscar NominationOscar win
1944Cover GirlLong Ago (and Far Away)Jerome KernIra GershwinCharles VidorRita Haworth (dubbed by Martha Mears)Oscar Nomination
* ORIGINALLY WRITTEN FOR THE STAGE BUT GIVEN A WHOLE NEW SET OF LYRICS ON ITS STAGE TO FILM ADAPTATION.
Oscar Hammerstein II and Otto Harbach wrote the original lyrics (to Jerome Kern’s music) for the original version of “I Won’t Dance” as it was sung on the London stage in the musical “Three Sisters.” The play was a flop, and when lyricist Dorothy Fields was asked to write new songs for the Fred Astaire-Ginger Rogers film version of the Kern-Harbach Broadway musical “Roberta,” also named “Roberta,” she took Kern’s original melody and gave it completely new lyrics. Hammerstaien and Harbach also received credit. Fields’ frequent collaborator at the time, Jimmy McHugh, received screen credit for “Additional Lyrics.”

**NOT explicitly written for the movie (see above).

Jay Livingston

JAY LIVINGSTON

(6)

YearFilm TitleSong TitleComposerLyricistDirectorIntroduced byNominationOscar
1948The PalefaceButtons and BowsJay LivingstonRay EvansNorman Z. McLeodBob Hope and Jane RussellOscar NominationOscar Win
1950Captain Carey, U.S.AMona LisaJay LivingstonRay EvansMitchell LeisenLes Baxter and his OrchestraOscar NominationOscar Win
1956The Man Who Knew Too MuchQue Sera, SeraJay LivingstonRay EvansAlfred HitchcockDoris DayOscar NominationOscar Win
1957Tammy and the BachelorTammyJay LivingstonRay EvansJoseph PevneyDebbie ReynoldsOscar Nomination_
1959The Hanging TreeThe Hanging TreeJay LivingstonMack DavidDelmer DavesMarty RobbinsOscar Nomination _
1965Cat BallouThe Ballad of Cat BallouJay LivingstonMack DavidElliot SilversteinTom Nardini/Michael Callan/Dwayne Hickman/Nat King Cole/Stubby KayeOscar Nomination

Livingston and Hoffman

JERRY LIVINGSTON and AL HOFFMAN

(1) and (1)

YearFilm TitleSong TitleComposerLyricistDirectorIntroduced byNominationOscar
1950CinderellaBibbidi-Bobbidi-BooJerry Livingston and Al HoffmanMack DavidWilfred Jackson/Hamilton Luske/Clyde GeronimiVerna FeltonOscar Nomination

Frank Loesser

FRANK LOESSER

(2)

(For Frank Loesser as Lyricist only, please see under Frederick Hollaender, Jimmy McHugh, Arthur Schwartz)
YearFilm TitleSong TitleComposerLyricistDirectorIntroduced byNominationOscar
1949Neptune’s DaughterBaby, It’s Cold OutsideFrank LoesserFrank LoesserEdward BuzzellRicardo Montalban and Esther Williams
Red Skelton and Betty Garrett
Oscar NominationOscar Win
1952Hans Christian AndersenThumbelinaFrank LoesserFrank LoesserCharles VidorDanny KayeOscar Nomination

Jimmy McHugh

JIMMY McHUGH

(5)

(For Jimmy McHugh as Lyricist only, please see under Jerome Kern)
YearFilm TitleSong TitleComposerLyricistDirectorIntroduced byNominationOscar
1935Every Night at EightI’m in the Mood for LoveJimmy McHughDorothy FieldsRaoul WalshFrances Langford
1935Every Night at EightI Feel a Song Coming OnJimmy McHughDorothy FieldsRaoul WalshHarry Barris and his Orchestra.
Alice Faye, Frances Langford and Patsy Kelly
1943Happy Go LuckyLet’s Get LostJimmy McHughFrank LoesserCurtis BernhardtMary Martin
1943Higher and HigherI Could’t Sleep a Wink Last NightJimmy McHughHarold AdamsonTim WhelanFrank SinatraOscar Nomination
1943Higher and HigherLoverly Way to Spend an EveningJimmy McHughHarold AdamsonTim WhelanFrank Sinatra

Henry Mancini

HENRY MANCINI

(5)

YearFilm TitleSong TitleComposerLyricistDirectorIntroduced byNominationOscar
1961Breakfast at TiffanysMoon RiverHenry ManciniJohnny MercerBlake EdwardAudrey HepburnOscar NominationOscar Win
1962The Days of Wine and RosesThe Days of Wine and RosesHenry ManciniJohnny MercerBlake EdwardsAndy WilliamsOscar NominationOscar Win
1963CharadeCharadeHenry ManciniJohnny MercerStanley DonenThe Henry Mancini Orchestra and ChorusOscar Nomination
1965The Great RaceThe Sweetheart TreeHenry ManciniJohnny MercerBlake EdwardsNatalie WoodOscar Nomination
1965The Great RaceHe Shouldn’t-A, Hadn’t-A, Oughtn’t-A Swang on MeHenry ManciniJohnny MercerBlake EdwardsDorothy Provine

JOHNNY MANDEL 

(1)

YearFilm TitleSong TitleComposerLyricistDirectorIntroduced byNominationOscar
1965The SandpiperThe Shadow of Your SmileJohnny MandelPaul Francis WebsterVincente MinnelliJack SheldonOscar NominationOscar Win

Johnny Mercer

JOHNNY MERCER

(1)

(For Johnny Mercer as Lyricist only, please see under Harold Arlen, Hoagy Carmichael, Henry Mancini, Victor Schertzinger, Harry Warren, and Richard Whiting)
YearFilm TitleSong TitleComposerLyricistDirectorIntroduced byNominationOscar
1955Daddy Long LegsSomething’s Gotta GiveJohnny MercerJohnny MercerJean NegulescoFred AstaireOscar Nomination

Alex North

ALEX NORTH

(1)

YearFilm TitleSong TitleComposerLyricistDirectorIntroduced byNominationOscar
1955Unchained Unchained MelodyAlex NorthHy ZaretHall BartlettTodd DuncanOscar Nomination

Cole Porter

COLE PORTER

(4)

YearFilm TitleSong TitleComposerLyricistDirectorIntroduced byNominationOscar
1936Born to DanceI’ve Got You Under My SkinCole PorterCole PorterRoy Del RuthEleanor PowellOscar Nomination
1943Something to Shout AboutYou’d Be So Nice to Come Home ToCole PosterCole PosterGregory RatoffJanet Blair and Don AmecheOscar Nomination_
1948The PirateBe A ClownCole PorterCole PorterVincente MinnelliGene Kelly and the Nicholas Brothers
(REPRISE)
Gene Kelly and Judy Garland
1956High SocietyTrue LoveCole PorterCole PorterCharles WaltersBing Crosby and Grace KellyOscar Nomination

Andre Previn

ANDRE PREVIN

(2)

YearFilm TitleSong TitleComposerLyricistDirectorIntroduced byNominationOscar
1960PepeFaraway Part of TownAndre PrevinDory PrevinGeorge SidneyJudy Garland
(voice only)
Oscar Nomination
1962Two for the SeasawSecond ChanceAndre PrevinDory PrevinRobert WiseJackie CainOscar Nomination

Hughie Prince

HUGHIE PRINCE

(1)

YearFilm TitleSong TitleComposerLyricistDirectorIntroduced byNominationOscar
1941Buck PrivatesBoogie Woogie Bugle BoyHughie PrinceDon RayeArthur LubinThe Andrews SistersOscar Nomination

Ralph Rainger

RALPH RAINGER

(1)

YearFilm TitleSong TitleComposerLyricistDirectorIntroduced byNominationOscar
1938The Big Broadcast of 1938Thanks for the MemoryRalph RaingerLeo RobinMitchell LeisenBob Hope and Shirley RossOscar NominationOscar Win

Richard Rogers

RICHARD RODGERS

(1)

YearFilm TitleSong TitleComposerLyricistDirectorIntroduced byNominationOscar
1945State FairIt might as Well Be SpringRichard RodgersOscar Hammerstein IIWalter LangJeanne Crain (dubbed by Louanne Hogan)Oscar NominationOscar Win

Harry Ruby

HARRY RUBY

(1)

YearFilm TitleSong TitleComposerLyricistDirectorIntroduced byNominationOscar
1951The StripA Kiss to Build a Dream On**Harry RubyBert Kalmar & Oscar Hammerstein IILaszlo KardosLouis Armstrong
Mickey Rooney with William Demarest
Sally Forrest
Kay Brown

Oscar Nomination
**In 1935, Kalmar and Ruby wrote a song calledMoonlight on the Meadow” for the Marx Brothers film “A Night at the Opera” (1935), but the song was not used. Oscar Hammerstein II later added new lyrics, resulting in the song “A Kiss to Build a Dream On.” After introducing the music in the movie, Louis Armstrong recorded it in 1951.

Victor Schertzinger

VICTOR SCHERTZINGER

(1)

YearFilm TitleSong TitleComposerLyricistDirectorIntroduced byNominationOscar
1941The Fleet’s InTangerineVictor SchertzingerJohnny MercerVictor SchertzingerThe Jimmy Dorsey Orchestra, with vocalists Helen O’Connell and Bob Eberly

Arthur Schwartz

ARTHUR SCHWARTZ

(3)

YearFilm TitleSong TitleComposerLyricistDirectorIntroduced byNominationOscar
1943Thank Your Lucky StarsThey’re Either Too Young or Too OldArthur SchwartzFrank LoesserDavid ButlerBette DavisOscar Nomination
1947The Time, the Place, and the GirlA Gal in CalicoArthur SchwartzLeo RobinDavid ButlerDennis Morgan, Jack Carson, and Martha Vickers (dubbed by Sally Sweetland)Oscar Nomination
1953The BandwagonThat’s EntertainmentArthur SchwartzHoward DietzVincente MinnelliFred Astaire, Jack Buchanan, Oscar Levant & Nanette Fabray

Jule Stein

JULE STEIN (7)

YearFilm TitleSong TitleComposerLyricistDirectorIntroduced byNominationOscar
1942Youth on ParadeI’ve Heard That Song BeforeJule SteinSammy CahnAlbert S. RogellMartha O’ DriscollOscar Nomination_
1944Follow the BoysI’ll Walk AloneJule SteinSammy CahnA. Edward SutherlandDinah ShoreOscar Nomination
1945 Anchors AwayI Fall in Love Too EasilyJule SteinSammy CahnGeorge SidneyFrank SinatraOscar Nomination
1948Romance on the High SeasIt’s MagicJule StainSammy CahnMichael CurtizDoris DayOscar Nomination
1949It’s a Great FeelingIt’s a Great FeelingJule SteinSammy CahnDavid ButlerDoris DayOscar Nomination
1954Three Coins in a FountainThree Coins in a FountainJule SteinSammy CahnJean NegulescoFrank SinatraOscar NominationOscar Win
1968Funny GirlFunny GirlJule SteinBob MerrillWilliam WylerBarbra StreisandOscar Nomination

Dimitri Tiomkin

DIMITRI TIOMKIN (4)

YearFilm TitleSong TitleComposerLyricistDirectorIntroduced byNominationOscar
1952High NoonThe Ballad of High NoonDimitri TiomkinNed WashingtonFred ZinnemannTex RitterOscar NominationOscar Win
1956Friendly PersuasionFriendly PersuasionDimitri TiomkinPaul Francis WebsterWilliam WylerPat BooneOscar Nomination
1957Wild is the WindWild is the WindDimitri TiomkinNed WashingtonGeorge CukorJohnny MathisOscar Nomination
1961Town Without PityTown Without PityDimitri TiomkinNed WashingtonGottfried ReinhardtGene PitneyOscar Nomination_

Jimmy Van Heusen

JIMMY VAN HEUSEN (18)

YearFilm TitleSong TitleComposerLyricistDirectorIntroduced byNominationOscar
1941Road to ZanzibarIt’s Always YouJimmy Van HeusenJohnny BurkeVictor SchertzingerBing Crosby (to Dorothy Lamour)
1942Road to MoroccoMoonlight Becomes YouJimmy Van HeusenJohnny BurkeDavid ButlerBing Crosby (to Dorothy Lamour)
1943DixieSunday, Monday, or AlwaysJimmy van HeusenJohnny BurkeEdward SutherlandBing Crosby
1943And the Angels SingIt Could Happen to YouJimmy Van HeusenJohnny Burke George MarshallPapa’s Delicate Condition
1944Belle of the YukonLike Someone in LoveJimmy Van HeusenJohnny BurkeWilliam A. SeiterDinah Shore
1944Going My WaySwinging on a StarJimmy Van HeusenJohnny BurkeLeo McCareyBing CrosbyOscar NominationOscar Win
1945 The Bells of Saint Mary’sAren’t You Glad You’re YouJimmy Van HeusenJohnny BurkeLeo McCareyBing CrosbyOscar Nomination_
1946Road to UtopiaPersonalityJimmy Van HeusenJohnny BurkeHal WalkerPapa’s Delicate Condition
1947The Road to RioBut BeautifulJimmy van HeusenJohnny BurkeNorman Z. McLeodBing Crosby (to Dorothy Lamour)
1955The Tender Trap(Love Is) The Tender TrapJimmy Van HeusenSammy CahnCharles WaltersDebbie Reynolds
&
Frank Sinatra
(Separately)
Oscar Nomination
1957The Joker is WildAll the WayJimmy Van HeusenSammy CahnCharles VidorFrank SinatraOscar NominationOscar Win
1959A Hole in the HeadHigh HopesJimmy Van HeusenSammy CahnFrank CapraFrank Sinatra & Eddie HodgesOscar NominationOscar Win
1960High TimeThe Second Time AroundJimmy Van HeusenSammy CahnBlake EdwardsBing Crosby with Henry Mancini and his OrchestraOscar Nomination
1960Ocean’s 11Ain’t That a Kick in the HeadJimmy Van HeusenSammy CahnLewis MilestoneDean Martin__
1961Pocket Full of MiraclesPocket Full of MiraclesJimmy Van HeusenSammy CahnFrank CapraSung offscreen by an unidentified choir during the opening creditsOscar Nomination
1963Papa’s Delicate ConditionCall Me IrresponsibleJimmy Van HeusenSammy CahnGeorge MarshallJackie GleasonOscar NominationOscar Win
1964Robin and the 7 HoodsMy Kind of TownJimmy Van HeusenSammy CahnGordon DouglasFrank SinatraOscar Nomination
1967Thoroughly Modern MillieThoroughly Modern MillieJimmy Van HeusenSammy CahnGeorge Roy HillJulie AndrewsOscar Nomination

Harry Warren

HARRY WARREN (20)

YearFilm TitleSong TitleComposerLyricistDirectorIntroduced byNominationOscar
193342nd Street42nd StreetHarry WarrenAl DubinLloyd BaconRuby Keeler, Dick Powell, and the ensemblePre-Musicians Branch AMPASPre-Musicians Branch AMPAS
193342nd StreetShuffle Off to BuffaloHarry WarrenAl DubinLloyd BaconRuby Keeler and Clarence Nordstrom
REPRISE
Ginger Rogers, Una Merkel, and the Chorus
Pre-Musicians Branch AMPASPre-Musicians Branch AMPAS
193342nd StreetYou’re Getting to Be a Habit with MeHarry WarrenAl DubinLloyd BaconBebe DanielsPre-Musicians Branch AMPASPre-Musicians Branch AMPAS
1933Roman ScandalsKeep Young and beautifulHarry WarrenAl DubinFrank TuttleEddie Cantor and the ChorusPre-Musicians Branch AMPASPre-Musicians Branch AMPAS
1933Gold Diggers of 1933We’re in the MoneyHarry WarrenAl DubinMervyn LeRoyGinger Rogers and the ChorusPre-Musicians Branch AMPASPre-Musicians Branch AMPAS
1934Moulin RougeThe Boulevard of Broken DreamsHarry Warren Al DubinSidney LanfieldConstance Bennett
1934DamesI Only Have Eyes for YouHarry WarrenAl DubinRay EnrightDick Powell
1935 Broadway GondolierLulu’s Back in TownHarry WarrenAl DubinLloyd BaconDick Powell
1935Gold Diggers of 1935The Lullaby of BroadwayHarry WarrenAl DubinBusby BerkeleyWinifred ShawOscar NominationOscar Win
1937Melody for TwoSeptember in the RainHarry WarrenAl DubinLouis KingJames Melton
1938Going PlacesJeepers CreepersHarry Warren Johnny MercerRay EnrightLouis ArmstrongOscar Nomination_
1938Hard to GetYou Must Have Been a Beautiful BabyHarry WarrenJohnny MercerRay EnrightDick Powell
1941Sun Valley SerenadeChattanooga Choo ChooHarry WarrenMack GordonH.Bruce HumberstoneGlenn Miller and his Orchestra
with The Modernaires, Dorothy Dandridge, and the Nicholas Brothers.
Oscar Nomination
1941Sun Valley SerenadeAt LastHarry WarrenMack GordonMack GordonGlenn Miller and his Orchestra
Pat Friday and John Payne
__
1942Orchestra Wives I’ve Got A Girl in KalamazooHarry WarrenMack GordonArchie MayoGlenn Miller and his Orchestra
With the Nicholas Brothers
Oscar Nomination
1943Hello, Frisco, HelloYou’ll Never KnowHarry WarrenMack GordonH. Bruce HumberstoneAlice FayeOscar NominationOscar Win
1945Diamond HorseshoeThe More I See YouHarry WarrenMack GordonGeorge SeatonDick Haymes
1946The Harvey GirlsOn The Atchison, Topeka, and the Santa FeHarry WarrenJohnny MercerGeorge SidneyJudy GarlandOscar NominationOscar Win
1953The CaddyThat’s AmoreHarry WarrenJack BrooksNorman TaurogDean MartinOscar Nomination_
1957An Affair to RememberAn Affair to RememberHarry WarrenHarold Adamson & Leo McCareyLeo McCareyVic DamoneOscar Nomination

Richard Whiting

RICHARD WHITING (3)

YearFilm TitleSong TitleComposerLyricistDirectorIntroduced byNominationOscar
1934Bright EyesOn the Good Ship LollipopRichard WhitingSidney ClareDavid ButlerShirley Temple
1937Hollywood HotelHooray for HollywoodRichard WhitingJohnny MercerBusby BerkeleyFrances Langford and Johnnie Davis with the Benny Goodman Orchestra
1937Ready, Willing, and AbleToo Marvelous for WordsRichard WhitingJohnny MercerRay EnrightWinifred Shaw and Ross Alexander

Allie Wrubel

ALLIE WRUBEL (1)

YEARFILMSONGCOMPOSERLYRICISTDIRECTORINTRODUCED BYNominationWin
1947Song of the SouthZip-a-Dee-Doo-DahAllie WrubelRay GilbertHarve Foster
(Live Action)
Wilfred Jackson
(Animation)
James BaskettOscar NominationOscar Win

Vincent Yeomans

VINCENT YOUMANS

(1)

YearFilm TitleSong TitleComposerLyricistDirectorIntroduced byNominationOscar
1934Flying Down to RioCariocaVincent YeomansEdward Eliscu and Gus KahnThornton FreelandAlice Gentle, Movita Castaneda, and Etta MotenOscar nomination

Victor Young

VICTOR YOUNG

(3)

YearFilm TitleSong TitleComposerLyricistDirectorIntroduced byNominationOscar
1945Love LettersLove LettersVictor YoungEdward HeymanWilliam DieterleDick HaymesOscar Nomination
1949My Foolish HeartMy Foolish HeartVictor YoungNed WashingtonMark RobsonMartha MearsOscar Nomination
1956Written on the WindWritten on the WindVictor YoungSammy CahnDouglas SirkThe Four AcesOscar Nomination

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Kind Hearts and Coronets (1949) Film Review  A+

Kind Hearts and Coronets (1949) Film Review A+

In “Kind Hearts and Coronets”: Alec Guinness has fun playing all eight (or nine) of the unfortunate D’Ascoynes, including Lady Agatha D’Ascoyne. The photograph shows Dennis Price with Joan Greenwood who plays that little minx Sibella.

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