The Little Things (John Lee Hancock): Violence and Forensics as Porn

The Little Things

Where is #MeToo when we need it. Director John Lee Hancock’s “The Little Things” opens with a young woman driving alone on a lonely dark California desert highway (homage to Janet Leigh in Hitchcock’s Psycho, maybe) singing along to the B52s’ “Roam” on the car radio. It’s “Roam” specifically, so we, the audience, get the sense that the movie may be set in circa 1989/1990. However, we have no idea why the movie might be set in 1989/1990 and 128 minutes later, as the closing credits role, we still have no idea. This, shall we say, careless attitude, is typical of the movie as a whole which, at it’s best, has no respect for it’s audience, and at at it’s worst, is a sleazy piece of porn masquerading as a whodunit. Back to the young woman in question. She is menaced by another driver (homage to Spielberg’s “Duel”, maybe), stops the car at a deserted (of course) filling station, and is now chased on foot by the still unseen driver until she sees a truck coming. She flags it down in the nick of time. Or is it? CUT. To police officer Denzel Washington doing some small town police action in what would appear to be somewhere in the Inland Empire, that vast desert and semi-desert running from the suburbs of east Los Angeles to the Coachella Valley (Palm Springs and the other “Desert Cities”) and the Arizona border. Washington’s character lives in what can only be described as a shack with only his dog for companionship. He is, however, quickly dispatched to LA for some reason, that’s also not entirely clear, but is obviously a plot device so he can check out, and then become a sort of partner with, an up-and-coming young buck played by fellow Oscar winning actor Rami Malek. Malek is investigating a series of murders in the LA area that may be the work of a serial killer, and, we are informed that Washington’s character, years earlier, was on the trail of possibly the same killer in Northern California, and that his obsession with the killer, and the pressure to break the case destroyed him. Once the film has set up the Washington-Malek dynamic however, it self-destructs.

Yes, we are presented with two potential suspects, played by Jared Leto and in a smaller but more impressive role Frederick Koehler, but the director is not really interested in them as characters and we quickly loose interest. There is no female character of note in this movie. We do, however, see lots and lots of female bodies in various stages of undress and decomposition. At the crime scene, on the forensic pathologist’s table and in Washington’s character’s recurring flashbacks. These women have no past and no character to latch on to so after a while you begin to feel unclean. The naked and decomposing female bodies pile up serving no purpose except to give a background to two cops who, we slowly realize – everything in this movie is slow – have little or no moral standing. You come away from this film without any sense whatsoever, that a series of young women were tortured and murdered. You come away feeling sorry for a bunch of actresses who had to appear semi-naked, in non speaking roles, in a bad movie. I had to take a shower afterwards

“The Little Things” is available for streaming at HBOMax, Amazon Prime Video and Apple TV

Share this post

You may also like…

ALWAYS GOOD FOR A LAUGH, THE SAG AWARDS ARE EXCEPTIONALLY DREADFUL THIS YEAR.

ALWAYS GOOD FOR A LAUGH, THE SAG AWARDS ARE EXCEPTIONALLY DREADFUL THIS YEAR.

Voted on by hundreds of actors, most of whom are too busy waiting tables to see movies at all, and, if they do, their choice is EXTREMELY limited. Limited mainly to Friday night at the Sherman Oaks Galleria. Anything even remotely off the beaten track will not be seen or even heard of. Hence the hideousness of what is listed below. End of discussion. Movies only.

read more
It is Hat-Trick, as “Drive My Car” wins Best Picture from the National Society of Film Critics (NSFC) following its triumphs in  NYFCC and LAFCA.

It is Hat-Trick, as “Drive My Car” wins Best Picture from the National Society of Film Critics (NSFC) following its triumphs in NYFCC and LAFCA.

With the announcement of the National Society of Film Critics (NSFC) choices, ‘Drive My Car” has now won the Best Picture award from all three major critic groups. This is quite an achievement and with its additional awards for Best Director, .Best Screenplay and Best Actor, it now stands an excellent chance of being Oscar nominated for Best International Film, Best Director and Best Adapted Screenplay and to become the 11th Foreign Language Film to be nominated in the Best Film category following in the footsteps of…..

read more

Subscribe for the latest reviews right in your inbox!

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *